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Affordable housing for aged and homeless

A $5.04 million South Australian housing development project, launched last week, will offer a secure environment to special needs groups, such as the elderly and homeless. Twenty-four units were built in Campbelltown, South Australia, by the James Brown Memorial Trust, which has a long and successful history in providing services and accommodation for people in need.
Photo: Supplied by James Brown Memorial Trust
Photo: Supplied by James Brown Memorial Trust

A $5.04 million South Australian housing development project, launched last week, will offer a secure environment to special needs groups, such as the elderly and homeless.

Twenty-four units were built in Campbelltown, South Australia, by the James Brown Memorial Trust, which has a long and successful history in providing services and accommodation for people in need.

James Brown Memorial Trust is known for constructing secure and affordable rental accommodation for people at risk of homelessness, as well as the elderly, those who are recovering from ill-health, drug or alcohol abuse, single and homeless Indigenous Australians, and people with disabilities or those on low incomes.

Dennis Chamberlain, chief executive of James Brown Memorial Trust, told DPS eNews the affordable housing development in Campbelltown were specifically targeted at people who “miss out” on housing opportunities due to affordability drawbacks.

He said fully-furnished rental properties in the Campbelltown area were generally rented out at $220 per week. However, the James Brown Memorial Trust furnished units are rented out at just $70 per week.        

“There is a substantial benefit to this low-cost housing rental property,” Mr Chamberlain said.

Some of the features of the units include:

  • Rain-water collection and use where it is estimated the site will be self-sufficient for water (apart from drinking water) for about 75% of the year;
  • The unit buildings are designed with reverse brick veneer to improve thermal properties in the construction. Reverse brick veneer allows buildings to cool-off faster in summer while retaining warmth longer in winter and;
  • Polished concrete floors which increase inherent thermal properties of buildings while reducing the recurrent cost of floor coverings and cleaning.

Mr Chamberlain said older people were particularly overlooked when it came to housing because many rental properties are often targeted to younger generations.

The housing development was allocated $2.26 million through the National Partnerships Agreement on Social Housing and is supported by the National Rental Affordability Scheme.

Minister for Housing, Jennifer Rankine, said the project was an “excellent example” of the outcomes that could be achieved when government and non-profit community organisations collaborate for a “common goal”.

According to Ms Rankine, the Campbelltown development would continue to be an affordable rental proposition.

“These new units offer a secure environment to provide each tenant with a home at an affordable price. The modern, high quality design features create an environment which tenants can certainly be proud of,” Ms Rankine said.

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